TRADITIONAL IRRIGATION SYSTEMS IN SOUTH MOROCCO

Irrigation in Morocco is an essential factor of agricultural productivity. The sharing of water on each parcel derives from water rights, determined in proportion to the participation of each family in the construction of irrigation networks.

Water clock

The equitable distribution of water is based on the principle of the water clock (or clepsydra) which allows to determine the duration of irrigation of each family, according to the water rights that it obtained during the construction of the khettara, granted by the council of elders of the village. The water towers (called "aoul") last on average from eight to ten days, and divide into "nouba" then "heba" which, numbering 120, are equivalent to twenty-four hours. The water clock is called "tanast" in Tata: the person in charge of "tanast" must guarantee the equity of the water sharing with precision. Come and discover the water clocks of Agadir Lehna, a particularly original multi-century instrument that illustrates the ingenuity of the Berber tribes of southern Morocco.

The khettaras

The oases of the Moroccan desert are supplied with water by Khettaras. Khettaras are centuries-old underground pipes that drain water from surface water tables to palm groves and fruit orchards. This very ingenious system, when it was created, required major improvements and is today recognized as an economic, ecological and sustainable response to water needs. You will discover in the oasis of Agadir Lehna the first khettara, built seven hundred years ago by a community of twenty four families who were engaged in farming in the oasis. Attractions not to be missed during your next trip to Morocco, although these khettaras are now endangered for lack of maintenance.

Village Territory :Tata 2017-10-09 00:00:00

Système traditionnel d'irrigation

Village Territory :Tata 2017-10-09 00:00:00

Système traditionnel d'irrigation

Village Territory :Tata 2017-10-09 00:00:00

Système traditionnel d'irrigation